Duncan Macmillan Reviews ‘Northern Lights’ in The Scotsman

I was thrilled to get a positive review from Duncan Macmillan in The Scotsman this week after he visited my show on Saturday.

“Meanwhile, the Graystone Gallery in Hamilton Place in Edinburgh is a new venture and is currently showing prints and paintings by Clive Ramage. I have noticed Ramage’s prints several times in group shows and the assembly of them here is certainly impressive.”

As well as being Professor Emeritus of the History of Scottish Art at Edinburgh University, Duncan has also been The Scotsman’s leading art critic for several decades and has written many authoritative books on Scottish art. So it meant a lot to me to hear that he had enjoyed the show and was particularly taken with my etchings.

Super Moon

He has praised my moon etchings in Scotsman reviews in the past and also recently gave a favourable mention to my Dunnottar Castle print, which was shortlisted for the inaugural Scottish Landscape Awards.

I’ll be back at the gallery on Saturday 24 February (2-4pm) for an Artist Talk, where I’ll discuss how I made these paintings and prints and also my inspirations. I’ll be happy to answer any questions you might have if you come along. Please contact gallery owner Lesley at the address below to book your free ticket:

lesley@graystonegallery.com

Northern Lights – A Solo Exhibition at Graystone Gallery, Edinburgh

Last Friday night saw the opening of my latest solo show Northern Lights at Graystone Gallery in Stockbridge, Edinburgh.

A welcoming window display with my latest oil painting of Muckle Flugga (finishedand framed  just hours before the show opened!)

And despite the inclement weather it turned out to be a busy private viewing, with people travelling from as far as Aberdeen, Glasgow and Fife for a first look at my latest work.

Over 40 of My Paintings & Prints on Show

With around 40 original pieces hanging across the gallery, it’s a real showcase of everything I’ve been working towards over the past 15 years.

The show is divided into three areas: oils, mixed media and etchings …

… with the pictures hung according to those groupings and in roughly equal numbers.

All in the name

I chose the title Northern Lights as it aptly reflects the nature and atmosphere of the majority of the work included in the exhibition. There are 12 oil paintings in the show, including the 3 above, which feature either Scottish lighthouses or shimmering twilight views across the Firth of Forth.

Glitter Moons – Yellow, Blue and Pink, etching and screenprint – 69x80cm (framed individually)

I’ve also included 3 original prints from my ‘luminous’ Glitter Moon series (above), as well as numerous colourful watercolours of Edinburgh and the East Neuk of Fife.

It’s not all about light and colour, however. In my etchings I focus more on the details, marks and tones that help to give each of the prints something distinctly different from all of my other work. On one wall you’ll find various craggy Scottish mountains and ruined castles, including Ben Nevis and Dunnottar. These are accompanied by atmospheric cityscapes of Edinburgh’s Old Town, Victoria Street and Dean Village …

The North Face, Ben Nevis, etching 44×18.5cm

… while on the opposite wall are more etchings of seascapes, including the old piers at both Culross and Aberdour (both shown below).

I’ll be back at the gallery on 24 February (2-4pm) for an Artist Talk, where I’ll discuss how I made these paintings and prints and also inspirations. I’ll be happy to answer any questions you might have too.

So if you’d like to attend then please get in touch with gallery owner Lesley at: lesley@graystonegallery.com

Northern Lights is on show now at Graystone Gallery in Edinburgh’s gorgeous Stockbridge and continues until 10 March 2024. If you manage to get along to see it then please get in touch and let me know what you think at cliveramage@gmail.com 

Some words from Graystone Gallery about the show …

“Look closely at the oil paintings in Northern Lights and you can sense a love of Whistler’s London nocturnes. Clive imbues his oils of lighthouses and the darker seascapes with that same feeling of delicate stillness and calm, building it with layer upon layer of transparent glazes …

Edinburgh Nocturne (Aurora), oil on canvas 98x98cm framed (detail)

The ramshackle buildings and highly detailed compositions and colour schemes of Schiele and Klimt’s landscapes have also had a big influence, which can be seen in the watercolours of coastal villages and Edinburgh in particular …

Ramsay Garden (ii), mixed media – 79x38cm framed

His intricate, detailed etchings, such as Dunnottar Castle, tell their own romantic stories, the individual marks carving out a brooding landscape …

Dunnottar Castle, etching – 77x59cm framed

In each of Clive’s works, there is a tangible sense of yearning, of a desire to create something that is beautiful, yet distant or unattainable. It’s there in those city lights twinkling and beckoning the viewer from far across the Firth of Forth …

The Bass Rock, oil on canvas 80x80cm framed

But there is also a drama at play in these atmospheric pieces that comes from a deeply felt need to create a perfectly constructed arrangement, or a harmonious symphony, out of the interplay between the land, the sea and the elements. Or, perhaps, the essence of Clive’s work is simply his attempt to try to capture and hold on to some long-sought feeling of calm and serenity.”

Graystone Gallery
52 Hamilton Place
Edinburgh
EH3 5AX
GENERAL OPENING TIMES

Weds-Fri: 11:00-18:00
Sat: 10:00-17:00
Sun: 12:00-16:00

Mon-Tues: Viewings and private sales by appointment

Scottish Landscape Awards at the City Art Centre, Edinburgh (4 Nov 2023 – 3 March 2024)

Saturday 4 November saw the opening of the inaugural Scottish Landscape Awards (SLAs) at Edinburgh’s City Art Centre.

And I was delighted to be able to attend the highly anticipated private view of this prestigious new exhibition the evening before, having had my etching of Dunnottar Castle shortlisted for the SLAs back in July.

It was one of only 133 artworks to be shortlisted from almost 3000 entries and, although it didn’t win a prize, I was extremely proud to see it hanging in a fantastic spot in one of the country’s best and most visited public galleries.

Dunnottar Castle, etching and aquatint

It was a wonderful evening of catching up with some old friends in my former Edinburgh stomping ground, as well as meeting a few of my own favourite artists for the first time. It also allowed me to see what’s happening right now at the sharp end of Scottish landscape painting and printmaking.

The variety of work on show at the Scottish Landscape Awards – not to mention the talent and skill employed to create it – ensure that this is a hugely enjoyable exhibition for artists and art lovers alike, showcasing the country’s huge diversity in subject matter and the many different and intriguing techniques used to create the pieces.

My partner Pam who accompanied me on the night

And, of course, its always great to see your work shown alongside your peers and some of this country’s most successful and admired artists.

Barbra Rae announcing the SLA winners (photo by Greg Macvean)

My image of Dunnottar Castle came about as part of a commission I was awarded by Aberdeen Art Galleries & Museums in January 2023. Click here to learn more about and the various printmaking methods I used in its creation. I am also very proud to have an artist’s proof of this print, along with the 3 others I produced for that commission, in Aberdeen Art Galleries & Museums’ permanent art collection.

Describing my working methods to the Friends of Aberdeen Art Galleries & Museums at the city’s Treasure Hub earlier this year on completion of the commission

This has been a particularly busy and hugely rewarding year for me so far: with two successful solo shows under my belt at Frames Gallery in Perth and Inverness Creative Academy; the aforementioned commission from Aberdeen Art Galleries & Museums; and another for luxury Edinburgh-based leather goods brand Strathberry Ltd (of which there will be more to report soon).

At the Scottish Landscape Awards private view with my show catalogue and print of Dunnottar Castle

And having my work included in the inaugural Scottish Landscape Awards exhibition, as well as featured in the gorgeous catalogue that accompanies the show, means that this has also been my most successful year to date.

Meffan Winter Show 2023

But it doesn’t end there for 2023, or for this particular print! I am happy to say that Dunnottar Castle is also featured in the Meffan Art Gallery annual winter show, which opened in Forfar on Friday 10 November.

As for the rest of the year, I will be working hard to produce new paintings and prints for my next solo show, which is at Graystone Gallery in Edinburgh in February. Details to follow, but I am excited to be the first artist to have a solo show at their brand-new gallery premises in Stockbridge.

The Scottish Landscape Awards is on until 3 March 2024 at the City Art Centre, Edinburgh. Click here to buy a gorgeous catalogue featuring every picture in the exhibition.

Dunnottar Castle, in a limited edition of only 40 signed and numbered prints, is currently available to purchase (in a frame) at the City Art Centre, Edinburgh and the Meffan Institute, Forfar. Unframed prints can also be bought directly from my shop by clicking here.

St Columba’s Hospice Art Show – opens in Edinburgh this Sat 28 October

Just a quick update to say I have 4 etchings for sale as part of the annual St Columba’s Hospice charity fundraising event, which opens to the public this Saturday 28th October at 10am.

The Bell Rock, photopolymer etching (42x42cm)

I’ve been taking part in this fantastic event every year for almost a decade and it’s always a great show. This year promises to be bigger and better than ever with paintings and prints by over 70 artists, alongside a selection of sculptures, ceramics and tapestries.

Victoria Street, Edinburgh, etching (16x21cm)

Buying art, helping others

At least 50% of every penny spent on art over this weekend goes directly to the charity, so it’s a great way to buy something you’ll love and cherish forever while helping the hospice continue to do its incredible work.

This year I have contributed the 4 pieces you can see here. But you’ve only got 2 days to see the show in person and snap them up (although the works can be viewed and purchased online between 10am Saturday 28th October and Friday 3rd November). Click here for the direct link to the online exhibition!

Fidra, photopolymer etching (19x42cm)

So if you’re in Edinburgh or fancy a day out then get along to the stunning St Columba’s Hospice building this coming Saturday or Sunday between 10-4pm and treat yourself to something beautiful … you know you deserve it! It’s worth the trip for the incredible views across the Firth of Forth alone!

Here’s where to find the art show. It’s free to enter and on-street parking is available:

17 Boswall Road, Edinburgh EH5 3RW

Aberdeen Art Galleries and Museums – Micro Commission

I was initially told about the Aberdeen Art Gallery & Museums (AAGM) Micro-commissions by a studio colleague the day before the deadline. I was in the middle of moving into my new studio and packing for a New Year trip to Crovie the following day. However, as a relative newcomer to Aberdeen and having spent many hours admiring the gallery’s fantastic collection, my interest had been piqued! I downloaded the application form and had a first draft written within an hour.

At the Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums’ (AAGM) Treasure Hub where I gave a talk about my Micro Commission work to the Friends of AAGM

The brief

Applicants were asked to say something about their lived experience in the city, addressing themes that might include social justice, climate change, identity, well-being and migration, while responding to something that was already part of the AAGM collection.

I thought it could be a challenge to come up with an exciting print-based project that would test some of my recently acquired printmaking skills, especially in screen and photopolymer printing. And, in the unlikely event my proposal was successful, I might just about manage to complete the rather ambitious project I had put together in my mind, despite having already committed to 2 solo shows and another important commission – all of which were to be fulfilled before the AAGM June deadline!

No holiday for me … not yet anyway!

So the first day of our supposedly relaxing holiday was spent editing my application (with considerable help from my patient and very understanding partner Pam) and it was submitted within an hour of the deadline.

Having never applied for anything like this before, I resignedly put the whole experience down to good practice and relaxed for the rest of our trip.

Success!

Around 4 weeks later, having forgotten all about my application and while frantically finishing several paintings and working on the final preparations for my early March solo show, I received an email to say my proposal had in fact been successful!

My initial elation and surprise at this great news were suddenly followed by a gut-wrenching dread that I might just have overstretched myself! But I do love a challenge and that’s exactly what the following 5 months proved to be!

The final 3 prints that make up the triptych: Disintegration, Transformation & Anticipation. I named the triptych with a nod to the 3 institutions that feature in the middle print; namely the Central Library, St Mark’s Church & His Majesty’s Theatre, collectively known by locals as Education, Salvation & Damnation.

The Proposal

In selecting a work from the AAGM collection as an initial reference for my own project, John Piper’s powerfully atmospheric painting of Dunnottar Castle immediately sprang to mind. Like many of his works, it perfectly captures with great drama and deceptive simplicity the beauty that can often be found even in a crumbling old building. This got me thinking about how the disintegration of one thing can lead to something new and possibly even more beautiful in its place (a painting in this instance, but also the castle itself).

Dunnottar Castle by John Piper

From here I travelled north in my mind to Aberdeen city centre and thought of the recently opened Union Terrace Gardens and how they have helped to rejuvenate that part of the city.

Newly reopened and rejuvenated Union Terrace Gardens (January 2023)

I then took a short trip across Union Street to the recently demolished Aberdeen Market and pondered how that has provided an opportunity (and also hope) that something better might arise out of the dust and rubble.

The currently vacant site of the old Aberdeen Market

I decided to produce a triptych of handmade prints exploring the theme of disintegration in relation to those three well-loved local sites. To bring these ideas to fruition I wanted to use three different printmaking techniques, which would reflect the past, present and future in their own way.

Three Different subjects printed three different ways

Disintegration

Disintegration, the first piece in the triptych, is a traditional copper-plate etching inspired by John Piper’s painting of Dunnottar Castle.

Disintegration – 40x60cm – copper plate etching with hard ground and aquatint (including sugar lift and spit bite) on Hahnemüle etching paper

 

Inking up the plate

 

Disintegration is signed and ready to deliver to Aberdeen Art Gallery when framed

Transformation

Transformation – 40x76cm – photopolymer etching with chine collé and watercolour on calendered Hahnemüle etching paper

The middle piece, Transformation, depicts Union Terrace Gardens and contrasts old and new features now present in the gardens and also in the methods used to create the print.

Chine collé tissue cut to shape for adding colour to the etching

It combines very traditional etching techniques like chine collé above to add colour  to the print …

An acetate was used to expose the image onto a photopolymer-coated steel plate

… alongside methods employed in contemporary digital photography.

Transformation completed at Peacock Print Studio in Aberdeen and ready for the AAGM collection

Anticipation

Anticipation – 40x60cm – screen print on calendered Hahnemüle etching paper

Anticipation focuses on the Aberdeen Market area and poses the question: what does the future hold for this site?

Making a composite of the various pictorial elements in Photoshop

Photoshop was used to combine a drone-captured digital image with an interpretation of the Herakut mural from the old Aberdeen Market.

A proof incorporating the hand-painted golden question mark

 

The final image of the triptych, Anticipation, is signed and ready to frame

The Micro Commission Experience

Working on the AAGM Micro-commission has been a fantastic experience as well as a great opportunity to learn. Not only because it has allowed me to develop and test my skills in traditional and photopolymer etching, as well as screen printing, but the funding that was provided by the Friends of Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums has also enabled me to produce an entirely new stand-alone series of prints that are quite different from anything I have done before. It is also wonderful to know that my triptych has been accessioned into the AAGM permanent collection.

Describing the processes involved in producing each print at Aberdeen’s Treasure Hub

I would advise anyone who is interested in applying to the next round of Micro-commissions to absolutely go for it. This has been a hugely rewarding experience and has shown me what I can achieve under intense pressure.

And finally …

Finally, I would like to say a huge THANK YOU to the Friends of Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums for providing the £2500 funding that enabled my Micro Commission, and many thanks also to Shona Elliot and all the staff at AAGM for their excellent support throughout. I’d also like to thank the staff at Peacock Print Studio and, in particular, James Vaas and Struan Hamilton who have both been very generous with their time, patience and expertise throughout this process.

I will put together another post soon where I will go into more detail about the making of each print in the triptych … watch this space!

Last week of my show at Inverness Creative Academy – Artist talk Fri 14th July

This is the final week of my solo show Paintings & Prints From Scotland To The Moon at Inverness Creative Academy.

I’ll be on site from 2-3.30pm this Friday 14th July to give visitors a guided walk around the 40 pictures.  I’ll discuss the many techniques I use to create the works as well as the inspirations and ideas behind them. I’ll also be more than happy to answer any questions about my practice and experience of working as a full-time artist.

It’s free entry so just show up at the cafe at 2pm and say hello. I’ll look forward to meeting you then!

Paintings & Prints From Scotland To The Moon is on until Saturday 15th July at 4pm.

Open daily until then 10-5pm.